ISBM Pulse: organizational culture

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The Hard Truth About Innovative Cultures

In this Harvard Business Review article, Gary Pisano shines a light on innovative cultures and analyzes why it is so hard to achieve an innovative organizational culture. According to Pisano, innovative cultures are paradoxical, having two sides of the coin. Innovative cultures have attractive, even ‘fun’ aspects, but are married with some tougher and less fun behaviors. Attempts to create innovative cultures will fail, unless these tensions are carefully managed: 

What Sets Growth Leaders Apart From Growth Laggards?

What distinguishes growth leaders from growth laggards? In this interview, George Day and Gregory P. Shea discuss how organically growing firms successfully attract, nurture, and retain innovation talent. The commitment to innovation is ingrained in a firm’s culture and organizational structures and processes. Innovation talent is drawn to organizations with these characteristics. 

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Building an Insights Culture in B2B2C (Matthew Rudd)

Many B2B suppliers are seeking the benefits of being more market-driven to aid both product innovation and commercial engagement for their consumer-driven customers.  This presentation is about how Lubrizol is developing an Insights culture and capability through a pragmatic approach, focused on selling and storytelling.

Creating a Culture of Unrelenting Innovation (Gerard Tellis)

Highly innovative and dominant incumbents frequently stumble or fail in today’s markets. Examples include Nokia, Blackberry, GE, GM, Sears, HP, Sony. Gerard Tellis and his colleagues have identified the culture of the organization as a major discriminator between failure vs unrelenting innovation and success.  This presentation will cover the six dimensions of culture and provide a metric by which firms can gauge themselves and benchmark against rivals in the market.

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Creating a Customer-Centric Culture (Ed O’Boyle)

As B2B industries have become increasingly commoditized, B2B companies have recognized the need for establishing a different type of relationship with their customers. Simply selling and delivering on a good set of products is no longer enough. B2B companies need to become partners with their customers, helping those customers address some of their most pressing business challenges. This had led to the proliferation of value-added services and solutions across B2B industries. It has also forced B2B companies to rethink how they manage their accounts to be customer-centric. This session will explore what it takes for B2B organizations to optimize their customer relationships to create a customer-centric culture and how focusing on your entire ecosystem can help unlock new ideas and growth opportunities for your organization and energize your culture.

The Golden Thread: Creating a Customer Centric Culture (Ed O’Boyle)

B2B companies are struggling to grow organically. The question then becomes: How can companies grow using their current customer bases? Through 80+ years of experience and over 100 million customer interviews, Gallup has developed a unique perspective on the matter. The short answer is that B2B companies can improve by optimizing their customer relationships. During this webinar, Ed O’Boyle, Gallup’s Global Workplace and Marketing Practice Leader discusses how focusing on your entire ecosystem can help unlock new ideas and growth opportunities for your organization.

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Organic Growth Demands a Strong Organizational Identity

Much has been written about the importance of understanding the customer journey. B2B companies need to equip their employees with a solid understanding of the company’s purpose in order to be truly customer centric. This two part article in the Gallup Business Journal explores how changing the internal culture can deliver a better experience all around.

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Failing To Innovate

Do business failures generate more creative solutions than successes? This article discusses the direct link between failure and innovation. The new way of doing business involves smart failure that leads to solutions sparked by risk taking.